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How to record calls with creditors, banks, and debt collectors

December 8, 2010 in "How-To" posts, Business by admin  |  No Comments

Difficult times call for making a record of who says what. Evoca makes it easy for you to record your phone calls with creditors, banks, debt collectors. You can easily document what they say to protect your rights in potential disputes.

You can use Evoca to record any telephone conversation, which is essentially an “interview”.  You can record the call whether you make the call or the other party calls you. Only need it for a month? By choosing the Evoca Express Pro subscription, you can choose how long to use it.

Here are two ways record a phone call with the other party. Practice your preferred method with a friend.

If you originate the call in one of the 38 U.S. states and the District of Columbia that does not require notifying the other party you are recording the call (see “About privacy laws” below):

Step #1: Dial the other party’s phone number. After a brief chat, tell him/her you need to put the call on hold and will be right back. Use your phone’s “three-way dialing” feature.
Step #2: Dial any of the Evoca phone numbers.
Step #3: After you hear the Evoca greeting and tone, “join” the three lines – you, the third party, and the Evoca number.
Step #4: Start talking. Mention your full name in the conversation and get the full name of the person and the company. “Hello again, this is Mary Smith. Would you please tell me your name and company?” And continue the conversation.
Step #5: Simply hang up when the call is over. The recording is instantly saved to your Evoca Express account as an MP3 recording. It is tagged with the date and length of the call. You can also add a title for the recording.

If you originate the call in a state that does require notifying the other party you are recording the call (see “About privacy laws” below):

Step #1: Dial the other party’s phone number
Step #2: Tell the third party that you are going to record the call and that you will put the call on hold while you bring in the recording service
Step #3: After you hear the Evoca greeting and tone, “join” the three lines – you, the third party, and the Evoca number.
Step #4: Start talking. Mention your full name in the conversation and get the full name of the person and the company. “Hello again, this is Mary Smith. Would you please tell me your name and company?” Continue the conversation. Start talking and ask the other party for her/his consent to be recorded.
Step #6: Simply hang up when the call is over.  The recording is instantly saved to your Evoca Express account as an MP3 recording. It is tagged with the date and length of the call. You can also add a title for the recording.

More:

  • Email it from your Evoca account to your attorney or adviser
  • Download it to your own computer
  • Keep it stored in your Evoca account as long as you choose
  • Order a transcription right from your Evoca account to receive it via email as a Word document
  • U.S. debt collectors have to comply with the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. This U.S. federal law promotes the fair treatment of consumers by prohibiting debt collectors from using unfair, deceptive, or abusive practices. They are prohibited from harassing, oppressing, or being abusive in collecting a debt. This includes using threats or obscene language, publicizing the debt, making annoying or anonymous telephone calls, and misrepresenting the identity of the collector, the status of the debt, and the consequences if it is not paid. This act applies to professional debt collectors who collect on loans they did not originate. Though it technically does not apply to banks, department stores, and other lenders who collect their own debts, no reputable lender is permitted to use such practices. Other countries have their own laws and regulations, such as Canada and the United Kingdom.

    About privacy laws: “(U.S.) Federal law allows recording of phone calls and other electronic communications with the consent of at least one party to the call. A majority of the states and territories have adopted wiretapping statutes based on the federal law, although most also have extended the law to cover in-person conversations. Thirty-eight states and the District of Columbia permit individuals to record conversations to which they are a party without informing the other parties that they are doing so. These laws are referred to as ‘one-party consent’ statutes, and as long as you are a party to the conversation, it is legal for you to record it. (Nevada also has a one-party consent statute, but the state Supreme Court has interpreted it as an all-party rule.)

    Evoca is not providing legal advice. Confer with your attorney as needed.

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